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J Pediatr. 2012 Nov;161(5):814-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.001. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

Unrecognized viral respiratory tract infections in premature infants during their birth hospitalization: a prospective surveillance study in two neonatal intensive care units.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital, Syracuse, NY, USA. njb35@cantab.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the frequency and effects of nosocomial respiratory viral infections (RVIs) in premature neonates, including those who may be asymptomatic.

STUDY DESIGN:

We performed a year-long surveillance for RVIs in infants <33 weeks gestational age admitted to 2 Syracuse neonatal intensive care units. Infants were enrolled within 3 days of neonatal intensive care unit admission and were sampled for RVIs until discharge using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay capable of detecting 17 different respiratory viruses or subtypes.

RESULTS:

Twenty-six of 50 prematurely born infants (52%) tested positive for a respiratory virus at least once during their birth hospitalization. Testing positive for a respiratory virus was significantly associated with longer length of stay (70 days vs 35 days, P = .002) and prolonged ventilatory support (51 vs 13 days, P = .002). Infants who tested positive for a respiratory virus during their birth hospitalization had more than twice the rate of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (P < .05).

CONCLUSION:

Nosocomial RVIs were frequent in our study population, despite the absence of clinical indicators of illness. Length of hospital stay was significantly longer and a diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was more common in infants who had respiratory viruses detected.

Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22694859
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3731035
Free PMC Article
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