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Orthopedics. 2012 Jun;35(6):e950-3. doi: 10.3928/01477447-20120525-40.

End-stage posttraumatic osteoarthritis treated with THA in osteogenesis imperfecta.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. george.chaus@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

Osteogenesis imperfecta is an incurable genetic disorder manifested with altered bone quality that predisposes patients to a multitude of fractures throughout their lives, including acetabular fractures. The management of acetabular fractures in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta remains a challenging clinical problem, with a paucity of literature supporting treatments and their outcomes. Limited reports in the literature validate the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, and they describe the adult population only.This article describes a case of delayed diagnosis of a transverse acetabular fracture and femoral head impaction fracture that led to posttraumatic end-stage hip osteoarthritis in a 16-year-old boy with osteogenesis imperfecta (Sillence Type I) that was sustained after minimal trauma. Clinical examination 3 months postinjury revealed a significant pelvic obliquity, severe pain with hip range of motion, and limited hip range of motion. Imaging studies revealed a complete loss of articular cartilage and significant joint effusion.The patient underwent THA. No postoperative complications occurred. Two-year follow-up showed an excellent clinical result. The patient's hip was pain free, and he was able to walk with no limp.The authors are unaware of any reported cases of children with osteogenesis imperfecta undergoing THA. Based on the reported literature and the authors' experience, THA can be a reliable surgical option for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

PMID:
22691673
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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