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Bull World Health Organ. 2012 Jun 1;90(6):444-51. doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.097048. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, Room 627 Pathology Building, Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Johns Hopkins University, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. fmateen@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum.

METHODS:

Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1 January to 31 December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System.

FINDINGS:

There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery.

CONCLUSION:

Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases.

PMID:
22690034
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3370367
Free PMC Article

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