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Surg Oncol. 2012 Sep;21(3):e131-41. doi: 10.1016/j.suronc.2012.05.001. Epub 2012 May 30.

Surgical resection of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine neoplasms: a systematic review.

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  • 1Hepatobiliary and Surgical Oncology Unit, University of New South Wales, Department of Surgery, St George Hospital, Q1 Kogarah NSW 2217, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) most commonly metastasize to the liver. Hepatic resection of NET hepatic metastases (NETHM) has been shown to improve symptomology and survival.

METHODS:

A systematic review of clinical studies before September 2010 was performed to examine the efficacy of hepatic resection for NETHM. As a secondary end-point, the impact of treatment on safety and symptomology were determined and prognostic variables were identified. The quality of each study was also assessed using predefined criteria incorporating 9 characteristics. Clinical outcome was synthesized through a narrative review with full tabulation of results of all included studies.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine included reported survival outcomes with a median 3-, 5- and 10-year overall survival of 83% (range, 63-100%), 70.5% (range, 31-100%), and 42% (range, 0-100%), respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 21 months (range, 13-46 months) and median 1-,3-,5- and 10-year PFS of 63% (range, 50-80 %), 32% (range, 24-69%), 29% (range, 6-66%) and 1% (range, 0-11%), respectively. Poor histologic grade, extra-hepatic disease and a macroscopically incomplete resection were associated with a poor prognosis. Studies reported a median rate of symptomatic relief from surgery in 95% of patients (range, 50-100%).

CONCLUSION:

Hepatic resection for NETHM provides symptomatic benefit and is associated with favourable survival outcomes although the majority of patients invariably develop disease progression.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22658833
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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