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Proteomics Clin Appl. 2012 Jun;6(5-6):257-67. doi: 10.1002/prca.201100078.

Plasma proteomics of differential outcome to long-term therapy in children with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatric Critical Care, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80045, USA. Michael.yeager@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The prognosis for children with IPAH unresponsive to therapy is poor. We investigated the plasma proteome for a molecular basis of good versus poor outcome to long-term vasodilator therapy.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Plasma was collected at baseline or shortly after therapy initiation and following chronic vasodilator therapy, then divided into those with good outcome (n = 8), and those with a poor outcome (n = 7). To identify proteins unique to either outcome, we used differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Results were confirmed by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

RESULTS:

Before and after therapy, SAA-4 was 4-fold lower in those with good outcome compared to those with poor outcome, while serum paraoxonase/arylesterase-1 was increased 2-fold in those with good outcome versus poor outcome. After therapy, haptoglobin and hemopexin were 1.45- and 1.8-fold lower, respectively, in those with a good versus poor outcome. Among those with a good outcome, SAP was 1.3-fold lower prior to therapy.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

SAP and SAA-4 regulate circulating mononuclear phagocytes. As such, they may contribute to the differential response to chronic vasodilator therapy in the context of inflammation in IPAH.

© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

PMID:
22653875
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3569520
Free PMC Article

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