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Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):335-43. doi: 10.2310/6620.2011.11043.

Textile dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Yellow 3 contain more than one allergen as shown by patch testing with thin-layer chromatograms.

Author information

  • 1Vilnius University Antakalnio Hospital Allergy Center, Antakalnio 124, Vilnius, Lithuania. laura.malinauskiene@med.lu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is known that some patch-test preparations containing disperse dyes contain impurities with unknown relevance for the development or elicitation of contact allergy.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the significance of the impurities found in the commercial dyes Disperse Orange 1 (DO1) and Disperse Yellow 3 (DY3) regarding contact allergy in patients with known sensitivity to them.

METHODS:

Ten patients allergic to DY3 and/or DO1 were tested with a dilution series of commercial and purified DY3 and DO1 (with water-soluble parts prepared from the commercial dyes) and with naphthalene sulfonate. Nine patients were additionally tested with thin-layer chromatograms (TLCs) made from the commercial DO1 and DY3 and with paper chromatograms made from the water-soluble part of these dyes.

RESULTS:

Eight of nine and three of six patients tested positively to the TLCs of DO1 and DY3, respectively. Among them, 4 of 8 and 2 of 3 patients, respectively, were positive also to another spot on the TLCs. One patient was positive to the paper chromatogram from the water-soluble part of DO1. None of the tested patients reacted to naphthalene sulfonate.

CONCLUSION:

The results of our study suggest that there are more relevant allergens in the fat-soluble and water-soluble fractions of the commercial disperse dyes.

PMID:
22653007
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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