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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Aug;97(8):E1451-7. doi: 10.1210/jc.2012-1784. Epub 2012 May 16.

Adolescent fiber consumption is associated with visceral fat and inflammatory markers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA. npollock@georgiahealth.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The link between adolescent fiber consumption, inflammation, and body fat distribution has not been investigated.

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigated associations of dietary fiber intake with inflammatory-related biomarkers and robust measures of total and central adiposity in a sample of 559 adolescents aged 14-18 yr (49% female, 45% Black).

METHODS:

Fasting blood samples were measured for leptin, adiponectin, resistin, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen. Diet was assessed with four to seven 24-h recalls, and physical activity was determined by accelerometry. Fat-free soft tissue mass and fat mass were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Visceral adipose tissue was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

Multiple linear regression, adjusting for age, race, Tanner stage, fat-free soft tissue mass, energy intake, and physical activity, revealed that dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with fat mass and serum leptin in males (all P < 0.03) but not in females. In both genders, dietary fiber intake was negatively associated with visceral adipose tissue, plasma C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen and positively associated with plasma adiponectin (all P < 0.05). No relations were found between dietary fiber intake and plasma resistin in either males or females.

CONCLUSION:

Our adolescent data suggest that greater consumption of dietary fiber is associated with lower visceral adiposity and multiple biomarkers implicated in inflammation.

PMID:
22593589
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3410273
Free PMC Article
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