Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Ann Hematol. 2012 Oct;91(10):1519-31. doi: 10.1007/s00277-012-1489-z. Epub 2012 May 16.

Metabolic factors and blood cancers among 578,000 adults in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can).

Author information

  • 1Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Helmholtzstr 22, 89081 Ulm, Germany. gabriele.nagel@uni-ulm.de

Abstract

We investigated associations between metabolic factors and blood cancer subtypes. Data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides from seven prospective cohorts were pooled (n = 578,700; mean age = 44 years). Relative risks of blood cancers were calculated from Cox regression models. During mean follow-up of 12 years, 2,751 incident and 1,070 fatal cases of blood cancers occurred. Overall, higher BMI was associated with an increased blood cancer risk. In gender-specific subgroup analyses, BMI was positively associated with blood cancer risk (p = 0.002), lymphoid neoplasms (p = 0.01), and Hodgkin's lymphoma (p = 0.02) in women. Further associations with BMI were found for high-grade B-cell lymphoma (p = 0.02) and chronic lymphatic leukemia in men (p = 0.05) and women (p = 0.01). Higher cholesterol levels were inversely associated with myeloid neoplasms in women (p = 0.01), particularly acute myeloid leukemia (p = 0.003), and glucose was positively associated with chronic myeloid leukemia in women (p = 0.03). In men, glucose was positively associated with risk of high-grade B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma, while cholesterol was inversely associated with low-grade B-cell lymphoma. The metabolic syndrome score was related to 48 % increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma among women. BMI showed up as the most consistent risk factor, particularly in women. A clear pattern was not found for other metabolic factors.

PMID:
22588328
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk