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Crit Care Med. 2012 Jul;40(7):2096-101. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e318250a887.

Randomized trial of automated, electronic monitoring to facilitate early detection of sepsis in the intensive care unit*.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Eastern Viriginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA. hoopermh@evms.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether automated identification with physician notification of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in medical intensive care unit patients expedites early administration of new antibiotics or improvement of other patient outcomes in patients with sepsis.

DESIGN:

: A prospective randomized, controlled, single center study.

SETTING:

Medical intensive care unit of an academic, tertiary care medical center.

PATIENTS:

Four hundred forty-two consecutive patients admitted over a 4-month period who met modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria in a medical intensive care unit.

INTERVENTION:

Patients were randomized to monitoring by an electronic "Listening Application" to detect modified (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) criteria vs. usual care. The listening application notified physicians in real time when modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria were detected, but did not provide management recommendations.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

The median time to new antibiotics was similar between the intervention and usual care groups when comparing among all patients (6.0 hr vs. 6.1 hr, p = .95), patients with sepsis (5.3 hr vs. 5.1 hr; p = .90), patients on antibiotics at enrollment (5.2 hr vs. 7.0 hr, p = .27), or patients not on antibiotics at enrollment (5.2 hr vs. 5.1 hr, p = .85). The amount of fluid administered following detection of modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria was similar between groups whether comparing all patients or only patients who were hypotensive at enrollment. Other clinical outcomes including intensive care unit length of stay, hospital length of stay, and mortality were not shown to be different between patients in the intervention and control groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Realtime alerts of modified systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria to physicians in one tertiary care medical intensive care unit were feasible and safe but did not influence measured therapeutic interventions for sepsis or significantly alter clinical outcomes.

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PMID:
22584763
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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