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Complement Ther Med. 2012 Aug;20(4):167-74. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2012.02.002. Epub 2012 Mar 2.

Acute effects of traditional Thai massage on electroencephalogram in patients with scapulocostal syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate acute effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on brain electrical activity (electroencephalogram (EEG) signals), anxiety and pain in patients with scapulocostal syndrome (SCS).

DESIGN:

A single-blind, randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

The School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Thailand.

INTERVENTION:

Forty patients, who were diagnosed with SCS, were randomly allocated to receive a 30-min session of either TTM or physical therapy (PT) using ultrasound therapy and hot packs.

OUTCOMES:

Electroencephalogram (EEG), State Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and pain intensity rating.

RESULTS:

Results showed that both TTM and PT were associated with significant decreases in anxiety and pain intensity (p<0.01). However, there was a significantly greater reduction in anxiety and pain intensity for the TTM group when compared with the PT group. Analysis of EEG in the TTM group showed a significant increase in relaxation, manifested as an increase in delta activity (p<0.05) and a decrease in theta, alpha and beta activity (p<0.01). Similar changes were not found in the PT group. The EEG measures were also significantly different when compared between the groups (p<0.01), except for delta activity (p=0.051), indicating lower states of arousal with the TTM treatment.

CONCLUSION:

It is suggested that TTM provides acute neural effects that increase relaxation and decrease anxiety and pain intensity in patients with SCS.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22579427
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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