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Eur J Nutr. 2013 Mar;52(2):637-46. doi: 10.1007/s00394-012-0367-8. Epub 2012 May 11.

Influence of breastfeeding versus formula feeding on lymphocyte subsets in infants at risk of coeliac disease: the PROFICEL study.

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  • 1Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In addition to genetic risk, environmental factors might influence coeliac disease (CD) development. We sought to assess the effect of the interaction between milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on peripheral lymphocyte subsets and their activation markers in infants at familial risk for CD.

METHODS:

170 newborns were classified in 3 different genetic risk groups (high risk, HR; intermediate risk, IR; and low risk, LR) after DQB1 and DQA1 typing. Lymphocyte subsets were studied at the age of 4 months by flow cytometry analysis.

RESULTS:

79 infants were receiving exclusive breastfeeding (BF) and 91 partial breastfeeding or formula feeding (FF). Regarding genetic risk, 40 infants were classified in HR group, 75 in IR group and 55 in LR group. Two-way ANOVA did not show significant interactions between the type of milk feeding and genetic risk group on the lymphocyte subsets analysed. One-way ANOVA for milk-feeding practice alone showed that the percentage of CD4 + CD25+ cells was significantly higher in BF group than in FF group (BF, 10.92 ± 2.71; FF, 9.94 ± 2.96; p = 0.026), and absolute counts of CD4 + CD38+ cells were significantly higher in FF group than in BF group (FF, 2,881.23 ± 973.48; BF, 2,557.95 ± 977.06; p = 0.038). One-way ANOVA for genetic risk alone showed that absolute counts of NK cells were significantly higher in IR group than HR and LR groups (IR, 539.24 ± 340.63; HR, 405.01 ± 239.53; LR, 419.86 ± 262.85; p = 0.028).

CONCLUSION:

Lymphocyte subset profiles in the early stages of life could be modulated by milk-feeding practices and genetic risk separately. Breastfeeding might have a positive immunomodulatory effect on lymphocyte subsets in infants at risk of CD.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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