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PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e35843. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035843. Epub 2012 Apr 25.

Impact of natalizumab on cognitive performances and fatigue in relapsing multiple sclerosis: a prospective, open-label, two years observational study.

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  • 1Department of Neurosciences and Sense Organs, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Natalizumab reduces the relapse rate and magnetic resonance imaging activity in patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS). So far the influence of natalizumab on cognitive functions and fatigue in MS remains uncertain. The aim of this prospective, open-label, observational study was to evaluate the possible effects of natalizumab on cognition and fatigue measures in RRMS patients treated for up to two years.

METHODS:

Cognitive performances were examined by the Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB), the Stroop test (ST) and the Cognitive Impairment Index (CII), every 12 months. Patients who failed in at least 3 tests of the BRB and the ST were classified as cognitively impaired (CI). Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) was administered every 12 months to assess patient's self-reported fatigue. One hundred and 53 patients completed 1 and 2 year-natalizumab treatment, respectively.

RESULTS:

After 1 year of treatment the percentage of CI patients decreased from 29% (29/100) at baseline to 19% (19/100) (p = 0.031) and the mean baseline values of CII (13.52±6.85) and FSS (4.01±1.63) scores were significantly reduced (10.48±7.12, p<0.0001 and 3.61±1.56, p = 0.008). These significant effects were confirmed in the subgroup of patients treated up to two years.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results demonstrate that a short-term NTZ treatment may significantly improve cognitive performances and fatigue in RRMS patients.

PMID:
22558238
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3338465
Free PMC Article
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