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Cancer Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;36(4):e221-6. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2012.03.006. Epub 2012 May 1.

Lymphoma subtype incidence rates in children and adolescents: first report from Brazil.

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  • 1Coordenação de Prevenção e Vigilância, Instituto Nacional de Câncer, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric malignancy. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence rates of lymphoma in children and adolescents in Brazil.

METHODS:

All cases of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) were extracted from 14 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) from 2000 to 2005, and included children and adolescents 0-19 years old. Analyses included age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIRs) and age-specific incidence rates (ASIRs) by each PBCR. A social exclusion index (SEI) was built and used as proxy for socioeconomic status (SES) levels. Correlations between SES and incidence rates were investigated using Spearman's test.

RESULTS:

The median incidence of lymphoma was 22.7/million. AAIRs of lymphomas varied from 12.9 (Salvador) to 34.5 per million (São Paulo). Median AAIR was 8.8/million, 9.8/million, and 2.9/million for NHL, HL, and BL, respectively. In all PBCRs except that of Recife, AAIR was slightly higher in males than females. The median ASIR was highest for HL (18.5/million) at 15-19 years for both genders. For NHL there were two peaks for ASIR: 11.1/million (1-4 years of age) and 13.2/million (15-19 years of age). The median ASIR for BL was highest among children aged 1-4 years (4.7/million) and in males. Higher SEI correlated with higher incidence of HL (P = 0.06), whereas rates of NHL and BL did not correlate with SEI. Borderline different incidence rates were observed in HL correlated with cities with higher SEIs.

CONCLUSION:

Incidence rates of lymphomas in Brazil do not differ compared to rates reported worldwide, although SES differences deserve further investigation.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22552334
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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