Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Brain. 2012 May;135(Pt 5):1606-21. doi: 10.1093/brain/aws092.

Disrupted surface cross-talk between NMDA and Ephrin-B2 receptors in anti-NMDA encephalitis.

Author information

  • 1CNRS, Interdisciplinary Institute for Neurosciences UMR 5297, Universite de Bordeaux, 146 rue Leo Saignat, Bordeaux, France.

Abstract

Autoimmune synaptic encephalitides are recently described human brain diseases leading to psychiatric and neurological syndromes through inappropriate brain-autoantibody interactions. The most frequent synaptic autoimmune encephalitis is associated with autoantibodies against extracellular domains of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, with patients developing psychotic and neurological symptoms in an autoantibody titre-dependent manner. Although N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors are the primary target of these antibodies, the cellular and molecular pathway(s) that rapidly lead to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor dysfunction remain poorly understood. In this report, we used a unique combination of high-resolution nanoparticle and bulk live imaging approaches to demonstrate that anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoantibodies from patients with encephalitis strongly alter, in a time-dependent manner, the surface content and trafficking of GluN2-NMDA receptor subtypes. Autoantibodies laterally displaced surface GluN2A-NMDA receptors out of synapses and completely blocked synaptic plasticity. This loss of extrasynaptic and synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor is prevented both in vitro and in vivo, by the activation of EPHB2 receptors. Indeed, the anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoantibodies weaken the interaction between the extracellular domains of the N-methyl-d-aspartate and Ephrin-B2 receptors. Together, we demonstrate that the anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoantibodies from patients with encephalitis alter the dynamic retention of synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor through extracellular domain-dependent mechanism(s), shedding new light on the pathology of the neurological and psychiatric disorders observed in these patients and opening possible new therapeutic strategies.

PMID:
22544902
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk