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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 May;206(5):444.e1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.03.002. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

Pharmacologic treatment for urgency-predominant urinary incontinence in women diagnosed using a simplified algorithm: a randomized trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. ahuang@ucsfmed.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes associated with the initiation of treatment for urgency-predominant incontinence in women diagnosed by a simple 3-item questionnaire.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a multicenter, double-blinded, 12-week randomized trial of pharmacologic therapy for urgency-predominant incontinence in ambulatory women diagnosed by the simple 3-item questionnaire. Participants (N = 645) were assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy (4-8 mg daily) or placebo. Urinary incontinence was assessed with the use of voiding diaries; postvoid residual volume was measured after treatment.

RESULTS:

After 12 weeks, women who had been assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy reported 0.9 fewer urgency and 1.0 fewer total incontinence episodes/day, compared with placebo (P ≤ .001). Four serious adverse events occurred in each group, none of which was related to treatment. No participant had postvoid residual volume of ≥ 250 mL after treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Among ambulatory women with urgency-predominant incontinence diagnosed with a simple 3-item questionnaire, pharmacologic therapy resulted in a moderate decrease in incontinence frequency without increasing significant urinary retention or serious adverse events, which provides support for a streamlined algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of female urgency-predominant incontinence.

Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22542122
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3570031
Free PMC Article

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