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Biomaterials. 2012 Jul;33(21):5267-77. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.03.074. Epub 2012 Apr 27.

Use of polyelectrolyte thin films to modulate osteoblast response to microstructured titanium surfaces.

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  • 1School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.

Abstract

The microstructure and wettability of titanium (Ti) surfaces directly impact osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. These surface properties are important variables that control initial interactions of an implant with the physiological environment, potentially affecting osseointegration. The objective of this study was to use polyelectrolyte thin films to investigate how surface chemistry modulates response of human MG63 osteoblast-like cells to surface microstructure. Three polyelectrolytes, chitosan, poly(L-glutamic acid), and poly(L-lysine), were used to coat Ti substrates with two different microtopographies (PT, Sa = 0.37 μm and SLA, Sa = 2.54 μm). The polyelectrolyte coatings significantly increased wettability of PT and SLA without altering micron-scale roughness or morphology of the surface. Enhanced wettability of all coated PT surfaces was correlated with increased cell numbers whereas cell number was reduced on coated SLA surfaces. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity was increased on coated SLA surfaces than on uncoated SLA whereas no differences in enzyme activity were seen on coated PT compared to uncoated PT. Culture on chitosan-coated SLA enhanced osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin production. Integrin expression on smooth surfaces was sensitive to surface chemistry, but microtexture was the dominant variable in modulating integrin expression on SLA. These results suggest that surface wettability achieved using different thin films has a major role in regulating osteoblast response to Ti, but this is dependent on the microtexture of the substrate.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22541354
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3618464
Free PMC Article
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