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J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012 Nov;40(8):1289-300. doi: 10.1007/s10802-012-9639-2.

Longitudinal predictors of school-age academic achievement: unique contributions of toddler-age aggression, oppositionality, inattention, and hyperactivity.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 4427 Sennott Square, 210 S. Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. lmb103@pitt.edu

Abstract

This project examined the unique predictive validity of parent ratings of toddler-age aggression, oppositionality, inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity to academic achievement at school-age in a sample of 566 high-risk children and families. The study also investigated potential indirect effects of the Family Check-Up on school-age academic achievement through changes in child behavior problems. The results demonstrated that toddler-age aggression was most consistently associated with school-age academic achievement, albeit modestly. Moreover, findings showed that the intervention predicted greater decreases in aggression from ages 2-3 to 4-5 compared to controls. The results suggest that in high-risk toddler-aged children, aggression may be a more consistent predictor of school-age academic achievement than other externalizing dimensions, which has implications for early identification and efforts to promote children's adaptation.

PMID:
22527610
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3518457
Free PMC Article
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