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Mutat Res. 2012 Jun 1;734(1-2):69-72. doi: 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2012.04.001. Epub 2012 Apr 16.

Spontaneous recurrent mutations and a complex rearrangement in the MECP2 gene in the light of current models of mutagenesis.

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  • 1Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Sofia Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Abstract

Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene are associated with Rett syndrome (RTT). The MECP2 gene has some unique characteristics: (1) it is mainly affected by de novo mutations, due to recurrent independent mutational events in a defined "hot spot" regions or positions; (2) complex mutational events along a single allele are frequently found in this gene; (3) most mutations arise on paternal X chromosome. The recurrent point mutations involve mainly CpG dinucleotides, where C>T transitions are explained by methylation-mediated deamination. The complex mutational events might be explained by the genomic architecture of the region involving the MECP2 gene. The finding that most spontaneous mutations arise on paternal X-chromosome supports the higher contribution of replication-mediated mechanism of mutagenesis. We present 9 types of mutations in the MECP2 gene, detected in a group of 22 Bulgarian and 6 Romanian classical RTT patients. Thirteen patients were clarified on molecular level (46.4%). The point mutations in our sample account for 61.5%. One intraexonic deletion was detected in the present study (7.7%). One novel insertion c.321_322insGAAG, p.(Lys107_Leu108insGluAlafs2*) was found (7.7%). Large deletions and complex mutations account for 23%. A novel complex mutational event c.[584_624del41insTT; 638delTinsCA] was detected in a Romanian patient. We discuss different types of the MECP2 mutations detected in our sample in the light of the possible mechanisms of mutagenesis. Complex gene rearrangements involving a combination of deletions and insertions have always been most difficult to detect, to specify precisely and hence to explain in terms of their underlying mutational mechanisms.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22525432
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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