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Bone. 2012 Jul;51(1):1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2012.03.029. Epub 2012 Apr 4.

School-based calcium-vitamin D with micronutrient supplementation enhances bone mass in underprivileged Indian premenarchal girls.

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  • 1Hirabai Cowasji Jehangir Medical Research Institute, Pune, India. anuradhavkhadilkar@gmail.com

Abstract

Low adult bone mass is linked to osteoporosis and fractures and is dependent on the extent of childhood and adolescent bone mineralization. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 1-year supplementation of calcium, multivitamin with zinc along with vitamin-D on bone mass accrual of school-going premenarchal girls from low income groups in Pune, India. Double-blind, matched-pair, cluster, randomization study was carried out in 214 premenarchal girls (8-12 years) from 2 schools in Pune, India. The two schools together formed 3 classes with 3 clusters each of age-matched girls of which one cluster was allocated to either one of the intervention groups (Ca-group:500 mg/d calcium, Ca+MZ-group:500 mg/d calcium+multivitamin tablet containing 15 mg/d zinc) or control group (C-group: multivitamin tablet without any minerals); all subjects received vitamin-D supplementation. Anthropometry, biochemical parameters, total body bone mineral content (TBBMC) and bone mineral density (TBBMD) (Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) were assessed at baseline and endline. Post supplementation, mean percent increase in TBBMC was significantly higher in Ca-group (22.3%) and Ca+MZ-group (20.8%) compared to C-group (17.6%) (p<0.05) with no significant differences observed between Ca+MZ and Ca groups (p>0.1). Improvement in TBBMC-for-age Z-scores was higher in the two calcium supplemented groups (13.6%-22%) compared to the C-group (no improvement). Calcium supplementation, with or without multivitamins and zinc, showed a promising improvement in bone health especially with regards to improvement in bone related Z-scores in our population of underprivileged premenarchal girls.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22503722
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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