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Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;200(6):491-8. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.111.099432. Epub 2012 Apr 12.

Visual cortex in dementia with Lewy bodies: magnetic resonance imaging study.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Wolfson Research Centre, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, UK. john-paul.taylor@ncl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Visual hallucinations and visuoperceptual deficits are common in dementia with Lewy bodies, suggesting that cortical visual function may be abnormal.

AIMS:

To investigate: (1) cortical visual function using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); and (2) the nature and severity of perfusion deficits in visual areas using arterial spin labelling (ASL)-MRI.

METHOD:

In total, 17 participants with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB group) and 19 similarly aged controls were presented with simple visual stimuli (checkerboard, moving dots, and objects) during fMRI and subsequently underwent ASL-MRI (DLB group n = 15, control group n = 19).

RESULTS:

Functional activations were evident in visual areas in both the DLB and control groups in response to checkerboard and objects stimuli but reduced visual area V5/MT (middle temporal) activation occurred in the DLB group in response to motion stimuli. Posterior cortical perfusion deficits occurred in the DLB group, particularly in higher visual areas.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher visual areas, particularly occipito-parietal, appear abnormal in dementia with Lewy bodies, while there is a preservation of function in lower visual areas (V1 and V2/3).

PMID:
22500014
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3365275
Free PMC Article

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