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Nutrition. 2012 Oct;28(10):978-83. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2011.12.001. Epub 2012 Apr 6.

A higher rate of eating is associated with higher circulating interluekin-1β concentrations in Japanese men not being treated for metabolic diseases.

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  • 1Laboratory of Nutritional Physiology and Global COE Program, University of Shizuoka, Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, Shizuoka, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we examined the relations between the rate of eating and circulating interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels in Japanese men not being treated for metabolic diseases.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 170 men 40 to 59 y old (mean ± standard deviation, 51.4 ± 5.7 y old) who participated in health checkups in Japan and were not being treated for metabolic diseases. We measured clinical serum parameters and plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations and assessed by questionnaire lifestyle factors such as the dietary intake of food/nutrition and the rate of eating. Using multivariate linear regression analysis, we analyzed the relations between the rate of eating and IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations, clinical parameters, and lifestyle factors.

RESULTS:

Significant Spearman correlation coefficients with the rate of eating were observed for IL-1β and IL-6 (0.250 and 0.195, respectively). The rate of eating was positively associated with IL-1β independently of IL-6, body mass index, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, alcohol intake, energy intake, smoking status, and physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate that a higher rate of eating is positively and independently associated with circulating IL-1β concentrations in Japanese men not being treated for metabolic diseases.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22483413
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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