Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Yonsei Med J. 2012 May;53(3):603-10. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2012.53.3.603.

Health related quality of life in common variable immunodeficiency.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome and Fondazione Eleonora Lorillard Spencer Cenci, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To quantify the health related quality of life in primary immunodeficiency patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We used generic health status and general psychological health questionnaires to determine the range of issues that needed to be considered in examining the burden of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

RESULTS:

The health status of patients with CVID was lower than that observed in normal subjects. Overall, Role-Physical and General Health scales correlated with a poorer clinical status. Surprisingly, the duration of disease did not influence health status. Being female, older, General Health Questionnaire-positive and alexithymic proved to be major risk factors associated with a poor health status. Patients with chronic lung disease and chronic diarrhea had the lowest values on the Medical Outcome Study, Short Form SF-36 (SF-36) scales. Disease severity perception was associated with the General Health Questionnaire and alexithymia status. Limitations in daily activities as a result of lower physical health were the major problems facing common variable immunodeficiency patients.

CONCLUSION:

Our data underlined the importance of conducting a periodical health related quality of life assessment on patients with primary antibody deficiencies and, moreover, stressed the necessity of providing psychological support to at risk patients.

PMID:
22477006
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3343431
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Fig. 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Yonsei University College of Medicine Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk