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Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Apr 3;9(6):360-70. doi: 10.1038/nrcardio.2012.45.

Stress and cardiovascular disease.

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  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK. a.steptoe@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

The physiological reaction to psychological stress, involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and sympatho-adrenomedullary axes, is well characterized, but its link to cardiovascular disease risk is not well understood. Epidemiological data show that chronic stress predicts the occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD). Employees who experience work-related stress and individuals who are socially isolated or lonely have an increased risk of a first CHD event. In addition, short-term emotional stress can act as a trigger of cardiac events among individuals with advanced atherosclerosis. A stress-specific coronary syndrome, known as transient left ventricular apical ballooning cardiomyopathy or stress (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, also exists. Among patients with CHD, acute psychological stress has been shown to induce transient myocardial ischemia and long-term stress can increase the risk of recurrent CHD events and mortality. Applications of the 'stress concept' (the understanding of stress as a risk factor and the use of stress management) in the clinical settings have been relatively limited, although the importance of stress management is highlighted in European guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention.

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PMID:
22473079
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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