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Eur J Pain. 2012 Nov;16(10):1357-67. doi: 10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00140.x. Epub 2012 Mar 29.

The correlation between pain-related behaviour and spinal microgliosis in four distinct models of peripheral neuropathy.

Author information

  • 1Section of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, UK. julieblackbeard@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Peripheral nerve injury is associated with a spinal microglial response that has been correlated with the development of behaviours reflective of neuropathic pain.

METHODS:

To examine whether this phenomenon is generalizable to neuropathic pain of non-traumatic aetiology, this study investigated the association between spinal microgliosis and behavioural measures of neuropathic hypersensitivity and pain-related anxiety behaviour in four distinct rat models of peripheral neuropathic pain. These were traumatic neuropathy [L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT)], HIV-related neuropathies (either treatment with the antiretroviral drug Zalcitabine (ddC) or combination of perineural exposure to the HIV-gp120 protein and ddC treatment) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:

Persistent mechanical hypersensitivity developed in all 'neuropathic' rats. However, spinal microgliosis, as measured by increased CD11b/c immunohistochemical staining and increased numbers of cells expressing CD11b measured by flow cytometry, was evident in the SNT and to a lesser extent in the HIV neuropathy models but not the VZV model. These results suggest that behavioural hypersensitivity and thigmotaxis can only be linked to a microglial response in certain models of neuropathy.

© 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

PMID:
22467279
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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