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Dig Dis Sci. 2012 Aug;57(8):2103-12. doi: 10.1007/s10620-012-2145-0. Epub 2012 Mar 31.

Single-incision versus conventional laparoscopy for colorectal disease: a meta-analysis.

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  • 1Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreato-Vascular Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China. zhouyms@yahoo.com.cn

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) was developed as a novel minimally invasive surgical approach.

AIMS:

The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare SILS and conventional laparoscopy (CL) for colorectal diseases with respect to perioperative and oncologic outcomes.

METHODS:

An electronic search was performed to retrieve all relevant articles published in the English language between 2008 and 2012 comparing SILS and CL for colorectal diseases. The data were analyzed with fixed-effect or random-effects models using review manager version 5.0.

RESULTS:

A total of 14 studies (one randomized controlled trial and 13 nonrandomized controlled trials) were found to be eligible and reported on 1,155 subjects, of whom 521 underwent SILS and 634 underwent CL for colorectal diseases. Concerning the perioperative outcomes, no differences were observed in conversion rate, operating time, and postoperative adverse events; however, patients who underwent SILS had lower blood loss, decreased blood transfusion requirement, shorter time to flatus, shorter hospital stay, and smaller incision. Concerning the oncologic outcomes, length of resected specimens, number of harvested lymph nodes, proximal margin, and distal margin, were comparable between two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a safe, feasible, and oncological efficient alternative to CL for colorectal diseases. Further larger, multi-centred, randomised controlled trial is indicated.

PMID:
22466079
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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