Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pain. 2012 Jul;153(7):1382-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2012.02.012. Epub 2012 Mar 31.

Growth hormone treatment for sustained pain reduction and improvement in quality of life in severe fibromyalgia.

Author information

  • 1Endocrinology Department Centro Médico Teknon and Clinica Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain. gcuatrecasas@cpen.cat

Abstract

Functional defects in growth hormone (GH) secretion and its efficacy as a complementary treatment have been suggested for fibromyalgia. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of low-dose GH as an add-on therapy in patients with both severe FM and low insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. A total of 120 patients were enrolled in a multicenter, placebo-controlled study for 18 months. They were randomly assigned to receive either 0.006 mg/kg/day of GH subcutaneously (group A, n=60) or placebo (group B, n=60) for 6 months (blind phase). The placebo arm was switched to GH treatment from month 6 to month 12 (open phase), and a follow-up period after GH discontinuation was performed until month 18. Standard treatment for fibromyalgia (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioids, and amitriptyline) was maintained throughout the study. Number and intensity of tender points, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) with its subscales, and EuroQol 5 dimensions test (EQ5D) with visual analogue scale (VAS) were assessed at different time points. At the end of the study, 53% of group A patients obtained fewer than 11 positive tender points, vs 33% of group B patients (P<.05). 39.1% vs 22.4% reached more than 50% improvement in VAS (P<.05). Group A patients showed significantly improved FIQ scores (P=.01) compared with group B. Although GH discontinuation worsened all scores in both groups during follow-up, impairment in pain perception was less pronounced in the GH-treated group (P=.05). In this largest and longest placebo-controlled trial performed in FM (NCT00933686), addition of GH to the standard treatment is effective in reducing pain, showing sustained action over time.

Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22465047
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk