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Clin Cases Miner Bone Metab. 2010 Jan;7(1):39-44.

Percutaneous vertebroplasty: the radiologist's point of view.

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  • 1Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital of "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs), usually caused by osteoporosis, is a disabling pathology associated with back pain, low quality of life and high costs. We report a retrospective study of 852 patients who underwent Percutaneous Vertebroplasty (PVP) in our department, for treatment of refractory back pain caused by osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the safety and the helpfulness of the PVP in vertebral osteoporotic fractures treatment and, particularly on durable pain reduction, mobility improvement and analgesic drugs need.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Follow-up analysis was made through a questionnaire filled by the patients before and after PVP (1-6 months), designed to measure pain, ambulation capacity, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) and analgesic drugs administration.

RESULTS:

A statistically significant difference between visual analogue scale (VAS) values before and after treatment has been observed. No difference between VAS values were observed at 1 and 6 months post-treatment period. The treated vertebrae number did not influence post-treatment VAS values during all the follow-up. Ambulation capacity and the ability to perform ADL have been improved following PVP. Patients also reported significant reduction in administration of medications after PVP.

CONCLUSIONS:

PVP is a safe and useful procedure in painful osteoporotic VCFs treatment, able to reduce pain, improve patients mobility and decrease analgesic drugs need.

PMID:
22461290
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2898005
Free PMC Article
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