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Neuron. 2012 Mar 22;73(6):1116-26. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2012.02.009. Epub 2012 Mar 21.

Sonic hedgehog expression in corticofugal projection neurons directs cortical microcircuit formation.

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  • 1Eli and Edythe Broad Institute of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. harwellc@stemcell.ucsf.edu

Abstract

VIDEO ABSTRACT:

The precise connectivity of inputs and outputs is critical for cerebral cortex function; however, the cellular mechanisms that establish these connections are poorly understood. Here, we show that the secreted molecule Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is involved in synapse formation of a specific cortical circuit. Shh is expressed in layer V corticofugal projection neurons and the Shh receptor, Brother of CDO (Boc), is expressed in local and callosal projection neurons of layer II/III that synapse onto the subcortical projection neurons. Layer V neurons of mice lacking functional Shh exhibit decreased synapses. Conversely, the loss of functional Boc leads to a reduction in the strength of synaptic connections onto layer Vb, but not layer II/III, pyramidal neurons. These results demonstrate that Shh is expressed in postsynaptic target cells while Boc is expressed in a complementary population of presynaptic input neurons, and they function to guide the formation of cortical microcircuitry.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
22445340
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3551478
Free PMC Article

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