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Public Health Nutr. 2012 Oct;15(10):1871-8. doi: 10.1017/S1368980012000031. Epub 2012 Mar 23.

Fruit juice consumption is associated with improved nutrient adequacy in children and adolescents: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006.

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  • 1Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 261 Knapp Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. coneil1@lsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the contribution of 100 % fruit juice (FJ) consumption to dietary adequacy of shortfall nutrients by children and adolescents.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

SETTING:

Secondary analysis of data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

SUBJECTS:

Children and adolescents aged 2-18 years (n 7250). Usual intake, determined from two 24 h dietary recalls, was calculated using the National Cancer Institute method. The population was dichotomized into consumers or non-consumers of 100 % FJ. The age/gender-specific percentage of the two consumption groups with intakes less than the Estimated Average Requirement or that exceeded the Adequate Intake for selected nutrients was determined. A Z-statistic for differences in population proportions was used to determine significance (P < 0.05).

RESULTS:

Children aged 2-5 years had the highest percentage of 100 % FJ consumers (71.1 %), followed by children aged 6-12 years (57.0 %) and adolescents aged 13-18 years (44.5 %). Compared with 100 % FJ consumers, a significantly higher percentage of non-consumers had intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement for vitamin A (24.4 (SE 2.5) % v. 42.2 (SE 2.5) %), vitamin C (0.1 (SE 0.2) % v. 38.9 (SE 4.1) %), folate (8.8 (SE 1.5) % v. 22.1 (SE 2.4) %), P (11.6 (SE 2.1) % v. 21.3 (SE 2.6) %) and Mg (25.8 (SE 1.7) % v. 46.1 (SE 2.0) %). A greater percentage of 100 % FJ consumers exceeded the Adequate Intake for K (2.4 (SE 0.5) v. 0.5 (SE 0.2) %) compared with non-consumers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Consumption of 100 % FJ is associated with improved nutrient adequacy and can contribute to a healthy diet.

PMID:
22443678
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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