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Diabetes. 2012 Jul;61(7):1814-21. doi: 10.2337/db11-1358. Epub 2012 Mar 20.

Resting-state brain networks in type 1 diabetic patients with and without microangiopathy and their relation to cognitive functions and disease variables.

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  • 1Diabetes Center/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. e.vanduinkerken@vumc.nl

Abstract

Cognitive functioning depends on intact brain networks that can be assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques. We hypothesized that cognitive decrements in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are associated with alterations in resting-state neural connectivity and that these changes vary according to the degree of microangiopathy. T1DM patients with (MA(+): n = 49) and without (MA(-): n = 52) microangiopathy were compared with 48 healthy control subjects. All completed a neuropsychological assessment and resting-state fMRI. Networks were identified using multisubject independent component analysis; specific group differences within each network were analyzed using the dual-regression method, corrected for confounding factors and multiple comparisons. Relative to control subjects, MA(-) patients showed increased connectivity in networks involved in motor and visual processes, whereas MA(+) patients showed decreased connectivity in networks involving attention, working memory, auditory and language processing, and motor and visual processes. Better information-processing speed and general cognitive ability were related to increased degree of connectivity. T1DM is associated with a functional reorganization of neural networks that varies, dependent on the presence or absence of microangiopathy.

PMID:
22438575
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3379683
Free PMC Article
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