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Transpl Int. 2012 May;25(5):564-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1432-2277.2012.01458.x. Epub 2012 Mar 21.

Maturity onset diabetes of the young: clinical characteristics and outcome after kidney and pancreas transplantation in MODY3 and RCAD patients: a single center experience.

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  • 1Service de Néphrologie, Dialyse et Transplantation, IFRNT, Hôpital Bicêtre, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

Abstract

The diabetes and renal phenotype of patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) on a transplantation waiting list is not known; neither is their outcome after pancreas (PT) and/or kidney transplantation (KT). Between 2002 and 2009, we screened 50 of 150 patients referred for kidney and pancreas transplantation to the Kremlin-Bicêtre center for HNF1B and HNF1A mutations if one or more of the following criteria was present (i) an atypical history of diabetes (ii) diabetes with at least one affected parent or two affected relatives, (iii) an absence of auto-antibodies at diagnosis (iv) a persistent secretion of fasting C peptide (v) a personal or a family history of renal cysts or dysplasia. Their phenotype and their outcome were analyzed. Four HNF1A (MODY3) and eight HNF1B mutations [renal cysts and diabetes (RCAD)] were identified. All MODY3 patients had diabetic nephropathy, but only 50% of RCAD patients. Four patients underwent a kidney and pancreas transplantation and two a kidney transplant alone. After 4.1 ± 1.1 years of follow-up, 83% of patients still have a functioning kidney and 75% a functioning pancreas. PT can be proposed with good results for MODY3 and RCAD patients.

© 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

PMID:
22432796
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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