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Neoplasia. 2012 Feb;14(2):150-8.

The brain microenvironment preferentially enhances the radioresistance of CD133(+) glioblastoma stem-like cells.

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  • 1Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

Brain tumor xenografts initiated from glioblastoma (GBM) CD133(+) tumor stem-like cells (TSCs) are composed of TSC and non-TSC subpopulations, simulating the phenotypic heterogeneity of GBMs in situ. Given that the discrepancies between the radiosensitivity of GBM cells in vitro and the treatment response of patients suggest a role for the microenvironment in GBM radioresistance, we compared the response of TSCs and non-TSCs irradiated under in vitro and orthotopic conditions. As a measure of radioresponse determined at the individual cell level, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci were quantified in CD133(+) cells and their differentiated (CD133(-)) progeny. Under in vitro conditions, no difference was detected between CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells in foci induction or dispersal after irradiation. However, irradiation of orthotopic xenografts initiated from TSCs resulted in the induction of fewer γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in CD133(+) cells compared to their CD133(-) counterparts within the same tumor. Xenograft irradiation resulted in a tumor growth delay of approximately 7 days with a corresponding increase in the percentage of CD133(+) cells at 7 days after radiation, which persisted to the onset of neurologic symptoms. These results suggest that, although the radioresponse of TSCs and non-TSCs does not differ under in vitro growth conditions, CD133(+) cells are relatively radioresistant under intracerebral growth conditions. Whereas these findings are consistent with the suspected role for TSCs as a determinant of GBM radioresistance, these data also illustrate the dependence of the cellular radioresistance on the brain microenvironment.

PMID:
22431923
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3306260
Free PMC Article
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