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J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2012 Oct;26(4):291-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jtemb.2012.02.005. Epub 2012 Mar 15.

Aluminium overload after 5 years in skin biopsy following post-vaccination with subcutaneous pseudolymphoma.

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  • 1CHU Poitiers, Department of Biochemistry, Poitiers, France. olivier.guillard@univ-poitiers.fr

Abstract

Aluminium hydroxide is used as an effective adjuvant in a wide range of vaccines for enhancing immune response to the antigen. The pathogenic role of aluminium hydroxide is now recognized by the presence of chronic fatigue syndrome, macrophagic myofasciitis and subcutaneous pseudolymphoma, linked to intramuscular injection of aluminium hydroxide-containing vaccines. The aim of this study is to verify if the subcutaneous pseudolymphoma observed in this patient in the site of vaccine injection is linked to an aluminium overload. Many years after vaccination, a subcutaneous nodule was discovered in a 45-year-old woman with subcutaneous pseudolymphoma. In skin biopsy at the injection site for vaccines, aluminium (Al) deposits are assessed by Morin stain and quantification of Al is performed by Zeeman Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Morin stain shows Al deposits in the macrophages, and Al assays (in μg/g, dry weight) were 768.10±18 for the patient compared with the two control patients, 5.61±0.59 and 9.13±0.057. Given the pathology of this patient and the high Al concentration in skin biopsy, the authors wish to draw attention when using the Al salts known to be particularly effective as adjuvants in single or repeated vaccinations. The possible release of Al may induce other pathologies ascribed to the well-known toxicity of this metal.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22425036
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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