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J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(3):226-34. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2011.589876.

Nonmedical use of prescription stimulants during college: four-year trends in exposure opportunity, use, motives, and sources.

Author information

  • 1Center on Young Adult Health and Development, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD 20740, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Examine trends in nonmedical use of prescription stimulants (NPS), including motives, routes of administration, sources, cost, and risk factors.

PARTICIPANTS:

1,253 college students.

METHODS:

Data were collected annually during academic years 2004-2005 through 2008-2009. Generalized estimating equations analyses evaluated longitudinal trends. Logistic regression models evaluated stability of associations between risk factors and NPS over time.

RESULTS:

Almost two-thirds (61.8%(wt)) were offered prescription stimulants for nonmedical use by Year 4, and 31.0%(wt) used. Studying was the predominant motive (73.8% to 91.5% annually), intranasal administration was modest (< 17% annually), and the most common source was a friend with a prescription (≥ 73.9% annually). Significant changes over time included decreasing curiosity motives, increasing overuse of one's own prescription, and increasing proportion paying $5+ per pill. Lower grade point average and alcohol/cannabis use disorders were consistently associated with NPS, holding constant other factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prevention opportunities exist for parents, physicians, and college administrators to reduce NPS.

PMID:
22420700
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3313072
Free PMC Article
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