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J Correct Health Care. 2012 Apr;18(2):111-9. doi: 10.1177/1078345811435476. Epub 2012 Mar 14.

Contraceptive use and barriers to access among newly arrested women.

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  • 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. larochef@ohsu.edu

Abstract

Incarcerated women report high rates of prior unintended pregnancies as well as low contraceptive use. Because jail could be a site of contraception care, this study aimed to assess women's access to contraception prior to their arrest. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 228 reproductive-aged, nonpregnant women arrested in San Francisco. Twenty-one percent were currently using contraception. More than half (61%) had not used contraception in the last year, yet 11% wanted to have used it. Women in this latter subset reported greater difficulty with payment, finding a clinic, and transportation compared to women who had used contraception. In addition, 60% of all women in the sample would accept contraception if offered to them in jail. Thus, jail is a potentially important and acceptable point of access to contraception, which can circumvent some preincarceration logistical barriers.

PMID:
22419640
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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