Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Mol Cell Biol. 2012 May;32(10):1984-97. doi: 10.1128/MCB.06305-11. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

The general transcription factor TAF7 is essential for embryonic development but not essential for the survival or differentiation of mature T cells.

Author information

  • 1Experimental Immunology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex that nucleates the assembly of transcription preinitiation complexes, also independently interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of other transcription factors, including P-TEFb, TFIIH, and CIITA, ensuring an orderly progression in transcription initiation. Since not all TAFs are required in terminally differentiated cells, we examined the essentiality of TAF7 in cells at different developmental stages in vivo. Germ line disruption of the TAF7 gene is embryonic lethal between 3.5 and 5.5 days postcoitus. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TAF7 deleted cease transcription globally and stop proliferating. In contrast, whereas TAF7 is essential for the differentiation and proliferation of immature thymocytes, it is not required for subsequent, proliferation-independent differentiation of lineage committed thymocytes or for their egress into the periphery. TAF7 deletion in peripheral CD4 T cells affects only a small number of transcripts. However, T cells with TAF7 deleted are not able to undergo activation and expansion in response to antigenic stimuli. These findings suggest that TAF7 is essential for proliferation but not for proliferation-independent differentiation.

PMID:
22411629
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3347399
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (9)Free text

Fig 1
Fig 2
Fig 3
Fig 4
Fig 5
Fig 6
Fig 7
Fig 8
Fig 9
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk