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J Food Prot. 2012 Mar;75(3):428-36. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-363.

Salmonella prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility from the National Animal Health Monitoring System Swine 2000 and 2006 studies.

Author information

  • 1Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2150 Centre Avenue, Building B, Fort Collins, Colorado 80526-8117, USA. charles.a.haley@aphis.usda.gov

Erratum in

  • J Food Prot. 2013 oCT;76(10):1666.

Abstract

Concern about Salmonella contamination of food is compounded by fear that antimicrobials traditionally used to combat the infection will become useless due to rising antibiotic resistance. Livestock, in particular swine, often are blamed for illnesses caused by Salmonella and for increasing antibiotic resistance due to use of antibiotics in pigs. As part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System Swine 2000 and 2006 studies, swine fecal samples were cultured for Salmonella. These samples were collected from 123 operations in 17 states in 2000 and from 135 operations in 17 states in 2006. At each operation, 50 and 60 fecal samples were collected from late finisher pig pens in 2000 and 2006, respectively. Salmonella isolates were characterized to determine serogroup and serotype and were tested for susceptibility to a panel of 17 and 15 antimicrobial drugs in 2000 and 2006, respectively. A total of 5,470 and 7,788 samples were cultured for Salmonella in 2000 and 2006, respectively. Overall, 6.2% of the samples and 34.2% of the farms were positive for Salmonella in 2000. In 2006, 7.2% of the samples and 52.6% of the farms were positive. Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Typhimurium var. 5- (formerly Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen), and Salmonella Agona were the three serotypes most often recovered in both study years. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern for Salmonella Derby in the two study years was resistance to streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Most isolates were resistant to tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and streptomycin in both study years. The proportion of Salmonella isolates that were susceptible to all antimicrobials (pansusceptible) was 38.1% in 2000 and 20.4% in 2006. The proportion of Salmonella isolates that were resistant to three or more antimicrobials (multidrug resistant) was similar in 2000 and in 2006 (52.8 and 57.7%, respectively).

PMID:
22410214
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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