Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Transplant Proc. 2012 Mar;44(2):338-40. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2012.01.063.

Difference of regeneration potential between healthy and diseased liver.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Yonsei University Health System, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to evaluate total and segmental liver regeneration by comparing preoperative computed tomographic (CT) volumetry and CT volumetry on postoperative day (POD) 7 after a right hepatectomy, in patients with various status and surgical indications.

METHOD:

We included 36 patients who underwent right lobectomy for living donor liver transplantation (healthy group), and 29 for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment (disease group). All of the disease group patients were Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class A. The regeneration of lateral, medial segment and total remnant liver volumes were assessed on POD 7 using a CT-based program. Total volumes and segmental volumes were measured for total liver, future liver remnant (FLR), and liver remnant. We calculated total and segmental early regeneration indexes, defined as [(VLR-VFLR)/VFLR]×100, where VLR is volume of the liver remnant and VFLR is volume of the FLR.

RESULT:

The VLR at POD 7 showed a 72.9% increase in volume among the healthy versus 55% in the disease group, (P=.012) In the disease group, segmental volume and regeneration indexes were also significantly lower than among the healthy group: 59.0% versus 46.9% in the medial and 86.8% versus 57.7% in the lateral segment (P=.023 and P<.001) respectively.

CONCLUSION:

The volume regeneration potential in diseased livers is significantly lower than that of a normal, healthy liver. So, we must consider a patient's liver status and volume profile before an extensive liver.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk