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J Bone Miner Res. 2012 Jun;27(6):1381-9. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.1587.

Temporal trends and determinants of longitudinal change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels.

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  • 1CaMos Coordinating Centre, McGill University, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

Vitamin D is essential for facilitating calcium absorption and preventing increases in parathyroid hormone (PTH), which can augment bone resorption. Our objectives were to examine serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and PTH, and factors related to longitudinal change in a population-based cohort. This is the first longitudinal population-based study looking at PTH and 25(OH)D levels. We analyzed 3896 blood samples from 1896 women and 829 men in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study over a 10-year period starting in 1995 to 1997. We fit hierarchical models with all available data and adjusted for season. Over 10 years, vitamin D supplement intake increased by 317 (95% confidence interval [CI] 277 to 359) IU/day in women and by 193 (135 to 252) IU/day in men. Serum 25(OH)D (without adjustment) increased by 9.3 (7.3 to 11.4) nmol/L in women and by 3.5 (0.6 to 6.4) nmol/L in men but increased by 4.7 (2.4 to 7.0) nmol/L in women and by 2.7 (-0.6 to 6.2) nmol/L in men after adjustment for vitamin D supplements. The percentage of participants with 25(OH)D levels <50 nmol/L was 29.7% (26.2 to 33.2) at baseline and 19.8% (18.0 to 21.6) at year 10 follow-up. PTH decreased over 10 years by 7.9 (5.4 to 11.3) pg/mL in women and by 4.6 (0.2 to 9.0) pg/mL in men. Higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with summer, younger age, lower body mass index (BMI), regular physical activity, sun exposure, and higher total calcium intake. Lower PTH levels were associated with younger age and higher 25(OH)D levels in both women and men and with lower BMI and participation in regular physical activity in women only. We have observed concurrent increasing 25(OH)D levels and decreasing PTH levels over 10 years. Secular increases in supplemental vitamin D intake influenced both changes in serum 25(OH)D and PTH levels.

Copyright © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

PMID:
22407786
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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