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J Pediatr. 2012 Aug;161(2):285-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.01.052. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

Prevalence of hyponatremia at diagnosis and factors associated with the longitudinal variation in serum sodium levels in infants with cystic fibrosis.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Diagnostic Support Action and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine/Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. elizabet@medicina.ufmg.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of hyponatremia at diagnosis in patients with cystic fibrosis and identify the factors associated with changes in serum sodium concentration over time.

STUDY DESIGN:

This longitudinal study investigated whether variations in serum sodium concentration were associated with age, diet, infection status, and climate/temperature. Multivariate analysis was performed using the random-effects model for longitudinal data.

RESULTS:

Hyponatremia at diagnosis was observed in 19 of the 20 patients (95%). Factors identified as associated with variations in serum sodium concentration were diet (P = .008) and climate/temperature (P = .005). Intake of solid foods appeared to greatly increase the serum sodium concentration (increase of 5 mEq/L after introduction of solid foods); however, a confounding factor between diet and age cannot be definitively ruled out. Climate/temperature contributed in an inverse way; a 1°C-increase in ambient temperature was associated with a 0.5-mEq/L decrease in serum sodium concentration.

CONCLUSION:

Infants with cystic fibrosis who feed on breast milk or formula and live in a high-temperature environment are at increased risk for hyponatremia, even when receiving a higher salt intake in accordance with recommendations.

Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22404954
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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