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J Immigr Minor Health. 2012 Dec;14(6):975-82. doi: 10.1007/s10903-012-9598-2.

Effect of tribal language use on colorectal cancer screening among American Indians.

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  • 1Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. aag27@cornell.edu

Abstract

American Indians have one of the lowest colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates for any racial/ethnic group in the U.S., yet reasons for their low screening participation are poorly understood. We examine whether tribal language use is associated with knowledge and use of CRC screening in a community-based sample of American Indians. Using logistic regression to estimate the association between tribal language use and CRC test knowledge and receipt we found participants speaking primarily English were no more aware of CRC screening tests than those speaking primarily a tribal language (OR = 1.16 [0.29, 4.63]). Participants who spoke only a tribal language at home (OR = 1.09 [0.30, 4.00]) and those who spoke both a tribal language and English (OR = 1.74 [0.62, 4.88]) also showed comparable odds of receipt of CRC screening. Study findings failed to support the concept that use of a tribal language is a barrier to CRC screening among American Indians.

PMID:
22402926
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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