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PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32622. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032622. Epub 2012 Feb 28.

A large population histology study showing the lack of association between ALT elevation and significant fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We determined the association between various clinical parameters and significant liver injury in both hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive and HBeAg-negative patients.

METHODS:

From 1994 to 2008, liver biopsy was performed on 319 treatment-naïve CHB patients. Histologic assessment was based on the Knodell histologic activity index for necroinflammation and the Ishak fibrosis staging for fibrosis.

RESULTS:

211 HBeAg-positive and 108 HBeAg-negative patients were recruited, with a median age of 31 and 46 years respectively. 9 out of 40 (22.5%) HBeAg-positive patients with normal ALT had significant histologic abnormalities (necroinflammation grading ≥ 7 or fibrosis score ≥ 3). There was a significant difference in fibrosis scores among HBeAg-positive patients with an ALT level within the Prati criteria (30 U/L for men, 19 U/L for women) and patients with a normal ALT but exceeding the Prati criteria (p = 0.024). Age, aspartate aminotransferase and platelet count were independent predictors of significant fibrosis in HBeAg-positive patients with an elevated ALT by multivariate analysis (p = 0.007, 0.047 and 0.045 respectively). HBV DNA and platelet count were predictors of significant fibrosis in HBeAg-negative disease (p = 0.020 and 0.015 respectively). An elevated ALT was not predictive of significant fibrosis for HBeAg-positive (p = 0.345) and -negative (p = 0.544) disease. There was no significant difference in fibrosis staging among ALT 1-2 × upper limit of normal (ULN) and > × 2 ULN for both HBeAg-positive (p = 0.098) and -negative (p = 0.838) disease.

CONCLUSION:

An elevated ALT does not accurately predict significant liver injury. Decisions on commencing antiviral therapy should not be heavily based on a particular ALT threshold.

PMID:
22389715
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3289659
Free PMC Article
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