Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Explore (NY). 2012 Mar-Apr;8(2):92-8. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2011.12.003.

A mind-body technique for symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Luther College, Decorah, IA 52101, USA. touslo01@luther.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

A novel mind-body approach (amygdala retraining) is hypothesized to improve symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the use of a mind-body approach for improving symptoms related to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue.

DESIGN:

This was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

The study was conducted in a tertiary-care fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue clinic.

PATIENTS:

Patients with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, or both were included.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients were randomly assigned to receive amygdala retraining along with standard care or standard care alone. Standard care involved attending a 1.5-day multidisciplinary program. The amygdala retraining group received an additional 2.5-hour training course in which the key tools and techniques adapted from an existing program were taught to the patient. A home-study video course and associated text were provided to supplement the on-site program. Both groups received telephone calls twice a month to answer questions related to technique and to provide support.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Validated self-report questionnaires related to general health, well-being, and symptoms, including Short Form-36, Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Of the 44 patients randomly assigned who completed baseline assessments, 21 patients completed the study (14 in the standard care group and 7 in the study group). Median age was 48 years (range, 27-56 years), and female subjects comprised 91% of the group. Analyses demonstrated statistically significant improvements in scores for physical health, energy, pain, symptom distress, and fatigue in patients who received the amygdala retraining compared with standard care.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22385563
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk