Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Sleep. 2012 Mar 1;35(3):395-406. doi: 10.5665/sleep.1704.

Age and sleep disturbances among American men and women: data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Author information

  • 1Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Grandner@upenn.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Explore the prevalence of sleep-related complaints across age groups, examining effects of sex, general health, and depressed mood.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

SETTING:

Epidemiologic.

PARTICIPANTS:

Complete-case analysis included 155,877 participants who responded to questions related to Self-Reported Sleep Disturbance (SLEEPDIST) and Self-Reported Tiredness/Lack of Energy (TIREDNESS).

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Outcomes were self-reported complaints in response to survey questions assessing SLEEPDIST and TIREDNESS, dichotomized as reporting a complaint < 6 versus ≥ 6 nights or days, respectively, in a 2-wk period. Predictors were age, general health, and depressed mood. All analyses were adjusted for race/ethnicity, income, education, and time since last medical checkup. Across all age groups, women reported more SLEEPDIST and TIREDNESS. Poor general health, mild depressed mood, and moderate/severe depressed mood were associated with SLEEPDIST and TIREDNESS. Both SLEEPDIST and TIREDNESS generally declined across the life span, with fewest endorsements in respondents older than 80 yr. For SLEEPDIST, odds ratios (ORs, reference = 80+) declined from age 18-54 yr, rose slightly, and then declined again after age 59 yr in men. The pattern was similar for women, except a more marked rise was noted from age 40-59 yr. The pattern was similar for TIREDNESS.

CONCLUSIONS:

Advancing age was not associated with increased Self-Reported Sleep Disturbance or Self-Reported Tiredness/Lack of Energy. These results suggest that the often-reported increase in sleep problems with age is a nonlinear phenomenon, mediated by factors other than physiologic aging.

KEYWORDS:

Aging, depression, epidemiology, fatigue, sleep quality

PMID:
22379246
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3274341
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk