Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 May;91(5):393-400. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e31824ad5b8.

Maximal strength training enhances strength and functional performance in chronic stroke survivors.

Author information

  • 1Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to demonstrate that maximal strength training improves muscle strength and to assess the effect of training on function, aerobic status, and quality-of-life among chronic stroke survivors.

DESIGN:

Ten patients acted as their own controls for 4 wks, before an 8-week training intervention. Patients trained 3 days/wk, with four sets of four repetitions at 85%-95% one repetition maximum in unilateral leg press and plantarflexion with an emphasis on maximal mobilization of force in the concentric phase.

RESULTS:

After training, leg press strength improved by 30.6 kg (75%) and 17.8 kg (86%); plantarflexion strength improved by 35.5 kg (89%) and 28.5 kg (223%) for the unaffected and affected limbs, respectively, significantly different from the control period (all P < 0.01). The 6-min walk test improved by 13.9 m (within training period; P = 0.01), and the Timed Up and Go test time improved by 0.6 secs (within training period; P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in walking economy, peak aerobic capacity, Four-Square Step Test, or health-related quality-of-life after training.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maximal strength training improved muscle strength in the most affected as well as in the nonaffected leg and improved Timed-Up-And-Go time and 6-min walk distance but did not alter Four-Step Square Test time, aerobic status, or quality-of-life among chronic stroke survivors.

PMID:
22357133
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk