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Eur J Pediatr. 2012 Jun;171(6):989-91. doi: 10.1007/s00431-012-1698-4. Epub 2012 Feb 17.

Unilateral inguinal hernia: laparoscopic or inguinal approach. Decision making strategy: a prospective study.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Federico II University of Naples, Via Pansini 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. ciroespo@unina.it

Abstract

The management of the contralateral region in a child with a known unilateral inguinal hernia is a debated issue among paediatric surgeons. The available literature indicates that the perspective of the child's parents is seldom. This study was performed to evaluate parents' views on this topic. After the Ethical Committee's approval, 100 consecutive patients under 12 years of age with a unilateral inguinal hernia were studied prospectively from March 2010 to September 2010. After an oral interview, a study form was given to the parents about the nature of an inguinal hernia, the incidence of 20 to 90% of a contralateral patency of the peritoneal-vaginal duct and the possible surgical options (inguinal repair or laparoscopic repair). The parents' decision and surgical results were analyzed. Eighty-nine parents chose laparoscopic approach, and 11 parents preferred inguinal exploration. Regarding their motives, all 89 parents requesting laparoscopic approach indicated that the convenience and risk to have a second anaesthesia was the primary reason of their decision. The 11 parents who preferred inguinal approach indicated that the fear of a new surgical technology was their primary reason. Conclusion There is no consensus about the management of paediatric patients with a unilateral inguinal hernia. We believe that a correct decision-making strategy for parents' choice is to propose them the both procedures. Our study shows that parents prefer laparoscopic inspection and repair in the vast majority of cases.

PMID:
22350286
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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