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Tob Control. 2012 Mar;21(2):162-70. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050200.

Tobacco industry denormalisation as a tobacco control intervention: a review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. ruth.malone@ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct a review of research examining the effects of tobacco industry denormalisation (TID) on smoking-related and attitude-related outcomes.

METHODS:

The authors searched Pubmed and Scopus databases for articles published through December 2010 (see figure 1). We included all peer-reviewed TID studies we could locate that measured smoking-related outcomes and attitudes toward the tobacco industry. Exclusion criteria included: non-English language, focus on tobacco use rather than TID, perceived ad efficacy as sole outcome, complex program interventions without a separately analysable TID component and non peer-reviewed literature. We analysed the literature qualitatively and summarised findings by outcome measured.

RESULTS:

After excluding articles not meeting the search criteria, the authors reviewed 60 studies examining TID and 9 smoking-related outcomes, including smoking prevalence, smoking initiation, intention to smoke and intention to quit. The authors also reviewed studies of attitudes towards the tobacco industry and its regulation. The majority of studies suggest that TID is effective in reducing smoking prevalence and initiation and increasing intentions to quit. Evidence is mixed for some other outcomes, but some of the divergent findings may be explained by study designs.

CONCLUSIONS:

A robust body of evidence suggests that TID is an effective tobacco control intervention at the population level that has a clear exposure-response effect. TID may also contribute to other tobacco control outcomes not explored in this review (including efforts to 'directly erode industry power'), and thus may enhance public support and political will for structural reforms to end the tobacco epidemic.

Comment in

PMID:
22345240
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3362192
Free PMC Article

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Figure 1
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