Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2012 Jun;15(2):195-201. doi: 10.1038/pcan.2011.60. Epub 2011 Nov 29.

Systemic inflammation and survival of patients with prostate cancer: evidence from the Glasgow Inflammation Outcome Study.

Author information

  • 1Academic Unit of Public Health, Centre for Population & Health Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. k.shafique.1@research.gla.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is some evidence that systemic inflammation may be associated with survival in patients with prostate cancer; however, it is unclear whether this is independent of grade. We therefore investigated the role of inflammation-based prognostic scores, the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and their associations with Gleason grade in patients with prostate cancer.

METHODS:

Patients from a cohort, the Glasgow Inflammation Outcome Study, who had diagnosis of prostate cancer, were included in this study. The mGPS was constructed by combining C-reactive protein and albumin whereas NLR by calculating the ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes. We estimated 5-year relative survival and relative excess risk (RER) of death by mGPS and NLR categories after adjusting for age, socioeconomic circumstances and Gleason grade.

RESULTS:

In all, 897 prostate cancer patients were identified; of those 422 (47%) died during a maximum follow-up of 6.2 years. Systemic inflammation appeared to have significant prognostic value. The mGPS predicted poorer 5-year overall and relative survival independent of age, socioeconomic circumstances, disease grade and NLR. Raised mGPS also had a significant association with excess risk of death (mGPS 2: RER =2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.37-4.23) among aggressive, clinically significant prostate cancer (Gleason grades 8-10).

CONCLUSIONS:

The mGPS is a strong measure of systemic inflammation, when compared with NLR. Prostate cancer patients with a raised mGPS had significantly higher risk of death for overall as well high-grade disease. Inflammation-based prognostic scores predict outcome in patients with prostate cancer and should be added to their routine clinical assessment.

PMID:
22343838
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk