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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012 Oct;67(4):563-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2011.11.939. Epub 2012 Feb 15.

Skin cancer after pancreas transplantation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skin cancer in patients who have undergone pancreas transplantation (PT) has not been extensively characterized.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to describe the incidence, tumor burden, and risk factors for skin cancer in PT recipients at Mayo Clinic from 1998 through 2006.

METHODS:

A retrospective study was performed by analyzing outcomes among a cohort of pancreas allograft recipients at Mayo Clinic between 1998 and 2006.

RESULTS:

Among 216 allogeneic PT recipients at 2, 5, and 10 years posttransplantation, the cumulative incidence of any skin cancer was 4.7%, 12.7%, and 19.6%; the cumulative incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was 2.8%, 10.3%, and 16.7%; and the cumulative incidence of basal cell carcinoma was 2.4%, 7.8%, and 17.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of a second squamous cell carcinoma developing was 56% at 2 years; the cumulative incidence of a second basal cell carcinoma developing was 36% at 2 years. Of the risk factors examined, only age and having a skin cancer before transplantation were predictive of skin cancer development.

LIMITATIONS:

This was a retrospective study. Results from a large tertiary center may not be generalizable.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nonmelanoma skin cancers commonly occur in recipients of PT, and those patients who have a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer have a very high likelihood of further skin cancer development.

Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22341468
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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