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Am J Med Genet A. 2012 Mar;158A(3):553-8. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.35202. Epub 2012 Feb 7.

Phenotypic variability in hyperphosphatasia with seizures and neurologic deficit (Mabry syndrome).

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  • 1Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. miles.thompson@utoronto.ca

Abstract

Hyperphosphatasia with neurologic deficit (Mabry syndrome) was first described in a single family (OMIM#239300) by Mabry et al. [1970]. Although considered rare at the time, more than 20 individuals with the triad of developmental disability, seizures, and hyperphosphatasia have been identified world-wide. The 1-6 mannosyltransferase 2, phosphatidylinositol glycan V (PIGV) gene has been found to be disrupted in some patients with the additional feature of brachytelephalangy. In the present report we identify three patients compound homozygous for PIGV mutations. Two siblings were found to be compound heterozygotes for c.467G > A and c.494C > A in exon 3 of PIGV (the c.494C > A PIGV variant is novel). A third patient with similar phenotype, was a compound heterozygote for the known c.1022C > A/c.1022C > T (p.Ala341Glu/p.Ala341Val) mutation. This patient was also noted to have lysosomal storage in cultured fibroblasts. In contrast, the fourth patient who had no apparent hand abnormality, was found to be heterozygous for a previously unclassified c.1369C > T mutation in exon 4 of the PIGV gene, resulting in a p.Leu457Phe substitution in the catalytic domain of the enzyme. Unless this variant has a dominant negative effect, however, it seems likely that another GPI biosynthesis gene variant may contribute to the disorder, possibly through digenic inheritance. Since slightly fewer than half of the nine cases presented in this report and our previous report [Thompson et al., 2010] have PIGV mutations, we suggest that other genes critical to GPI anchor biosynthesis are likely to be disrupted in some patients.

Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
22315194
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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